TONY DeLAP
 
 
 
 
Tony Delap - 66.jpeg
 

His [DeLap’s] whole art is marked by this sense of critical concern, which, with his immaculate craftsmanship, specifically communicates a feeling of perfection that entrances the eye.

John Coplans, Delap, Space and Illusion, ArtForum, February 1964

 

Tony DeLap is one of the most original figures to emerge in the sixties and he continues to push the tradition of geometric abstraction into the future.

Barbara Rose, Now You See It, Now You Don’t, 2014

 
 

Early Sculpture

 
IMG_0156.JPG
 
 

Early Sculpture

“The context of DeLap’s work was not that of his own generation but of that of his colleagues at UCI. DeLap was already a mature and accomplished artists when Coplans hired him in 1965. That year Donald Judd included DeLap, along with Larry Bell, Robert Morris, John Chamberlain, Frank Stella, and Yves Klein, in his historic article “Specific Objects.” In this influential essay, Judd defined a new category of art that denied the illusionism of painting in favor of the literal three-dimensionality of objects in real space.”

Barbara Rose, 2000 on ‘Specific Objects’ by Donald Judd, 1965

 
 
 

Early Painting

 
0johnso_0johnso-R5-E170bw.jpg
 
 

Early Painting

Paintings from the ‘70s, continuing into the 2000s, involve a complex simplicity of shaped wood and canvas.  They are informed by the artist's interests in Architecture, Modernism, the Russian Constructivists, the history of magic illusions, and optical effects like hyperbolic paraboloids and mobius strips.   

 
 
 
 

Current Works

 
JOLIET-DeLap-Final-1544e.jpg
 
 

Current Works

DeLaps recent works continue these interests, with  greater emphasis on Illusionism. As Piers Veness  suggests, "One of his [DeLap’s] illusory tricks teases the relationship between the painting plane and the wall upon which it sits, creating a spatial push and pull. The flat slabs of acrylic automatically draw attention to the painting’s ‘objectness’…” -Piers Veness,review of DeLap exhibition, Edel Assanti Gallery, London. Saturation Point, Oct. 2018

At its core, DeLap’s work explores how the interaction of geometric shapes can create dimensionality and movement on static planes.